SHOWALL FUN PRANKS HIGH VOLTAGE LAZARUS-64 PHOTOGRAPHY SPY GADGETS VIDEO GAME
Figure 4 - The plastic casing will usually be snapped together from the inside
Figure 4 - The plastic casing will usually be snapped together from the inside

Taking out all of the visible screws is the easy part, and now comes the real fun - prying the plastic casing apart to reveal the internals. Most likely, the two or more plastic casing parts will be snapped together, held by friction on the inside, so you will need to carefully pry open the parts using a small knife blade or flat screwdriver blade. If you are afraid of damaging your camera then it's not too late to chicken out and put back the screws. If you decide to continue, then expect a few scrapes along the edges as you pry away with your screwdriver.

To being to pry apart the casing, carefully wedge a small flat screwdriver blade into the edge as shown in Figure 4 so you can start to force the two plastic halves apart. Don't dig in too deep or you run the risk of damaging the electronics. Since these cameras are full to the brim with small components, expect that there will be no space between the inside of the casing and the circuit board. Once you dig in enough to gain some leverage, pry the screwdriver until you get the first plastic latch to pop open. Once you have one gap, the rest will be fairly easy, but do take your time and try to keep the screwdriver from reaching into the cabinet as you go along.



Figure 5 - There is a danger lurking inside every camera that includes a flash
Figure 5 - There is a danger lurking inside every camera that includes a flash

Now is a good time for a warning. Inside any camera that includes a flash is a 350 volt capacitor that will hold a charge for months at a time. I guarantee that once you get your fingers across the charged terminal, you will take notice to never do it again! How can something so small be so dangerous you ask? Well, the capacitor has to hold a voltage that is more than three times the voltage that you will find in your AC outlets in order to fire the xenon flash tube in the camera, and although the current is kept fairly low, the resulting shock from the charged capacitor will wake you up in a way you will never forget. Trust me - I have zapped myself more times than I care to remember.

Figure 5 (inset) shows the beasty you are looking to avoid - the small half inch black cylinder with two leads coming out of one end. Once you have identified the capacitor, short a screwdriver across the leads if you can reach them so that you don't end up taking the voltage with your fingertips. If you can't see the capacitor, then you "may" be safe from the high voltage, but do work carefully.

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