SHOWALL FUN PRANKS HIGH VOLTAGE LAZARUS-64 PHOTOGRAPHY SPY GADGETS VIDEO GAME
Figure 20 - An interesting night shot using the 60 watt ultraviolet light bulb
Figure 20 - An interesting night shot using the 60 watt ultraviolet light bulb

The interesting shot shown in Figure 20 was taken by running the 60 watt incandescent black light in my desk lamp as I photographed both the light and the scene as viewed on the monitor by the low lux black and white security camera. The digital camera used to take the photo picked up the dull violet glow from the ultraviolet light and was able to see right through the bulb to capture the lit tungsten filament. On the monitor, the camera easily sees the nearby objects in the room as well as the super bright phosphorescence of my black sweater. Another interesting effect of using the ultraviolet illumination is the ability to see right through certain materials, revealing what is underneath somewhat. This effect has been dubbed "x-ray vision", and the effect can be seen from illumination by both infrared and ultraviolet light sources. The x-ray effect can almost see through certain types of clothing, but the effect really depends on materials, lighting, and infrared heat.



Figure 21 - Using the small infrared flashlight with a portable night vision viewer
Figure 21 - Using the small infrared flashlight with a portable night vision viewer

The image shown in Figure 21 was captured by feeding the video input on a standard camcorder with the output from my small spy cam while illuminating the scene with the small hand held infrared flashlight shown in figure 12. By looking through the camcorder's viewfinder, I essentially have a portable night vision viewer that can record everything it sees in pure darkness, allowing me to navigate by looking at the scene in the viewfinder. The hand held flashlight makes it easy to illuminate the part of the room I need to see while I walk around in complete darkness.



Some of the other materials that I found had some infrared passing abilities were: dark glass bottles, camera lens caps, thin black plastics, some black paints, and even some cloth materials. Have fun creating light that only your spy cameras can see. If you find a new material that has great filtering capabilities, stop by the LucidScience forum and tell us about it.
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